Illustration

Project Resources

As part of our commitment to an ‘open-source’ approach to developing energy efficiency/smart city solutions, we are able to share with you a full training webinar of the ‘systems thinking’ approach that we have adopted, as well as other supporting documents which can utilised by cities and organisations.

Introduced by Professor Mike Yearworth of the Engineering Faculty at the University of Bristol, the videos included below are designed to provide an introduction to the general background and concepts of systems thinking. The sessions have been split into six parts which can be downloaded as many times as you like.

We have also included the public documents that are produced as part of the formal project process and which can be utilised by other cities and organisations. These will appear in chronological order as they are finalised and signed-off by the European commission. Finally, we have provided all of the newsletters that have been printed to advertise the project. These can also be downloaded and circulated.

Webinars & Videos

Introduced by Dr Mike Yearworth of the Faculty of Engineering at the University of Bristol, the videos included below are designed to provide an introduction to the general background and concepts of systems thinking. The sessions have been split into six parts.

Introduction

Filmed during a training session conducted at The Engine Shed in Bristol’s Temple Quarter Enterprise Zone, Dr Yearworth welcomes project partners from San Sebastian and Florence and outlines the main six learning outcomes for the session. Dr Yearworth also provides some background to the concepts underpinning systems thinking, describing it as both an academic discipline and a problem structuring approach to dealing with messy complex issues.

Download file   (48MB MP4 file)

Systemic Problem Structuring

In this section Dr Yearworth provides further systems principles associated with problem structuring methods, specifically focussing on characterising the difference between the hard systems and soft systems traditions and how the STEEP project will be making use of soft, conceptual, systems models. Of fundamental importance in this section is getting across an appreciation of working with multiple conflicting stakeholder worldviews through the use of group model building workshops.

Download file   (165MB MP4 file)

System Purpose

Here we describe how to structure a top-level transformational statement, which will be the focus of the system we require to achieve change. Drawing on the creation of root definitions in Soft Systems Methodology we show how to describe the overall transformation that the modelling is trying to achieve and the relevant owners, actors and customers of this transformation.

Download file   (95MB MP4 file)

Systems Modelling

This session describes the specific systems modelling approach that forms the basis of the Problem Structuring Method being used by the STEEP project. Dr Yearworth describes the use of Hierarchical Process Modelling as a means to discuss how a transformational process, such as achieving the low operation carbon development in the Bristol Temple Quarter Enterprise Zone, can be achieved.

Download file   (83MB MP4 file)

System Performance

This chapter explains how stakeholders in a group model building workshop can begin to evaluate the performance of processes in the system. We use a specific three-valued logic which uses colours to represent good performance (green), unknown performance or uncertainty (white), and poor performance (red). For obvious reasons we refer to this notation as ‘Italian Flag’. We use assessments of poor performance and uncertainty as a guide to directing the actions we need to take to achieve the transformational objective.

Download file   (53MB MP4 file)

Necessary and Sufficient Processes

In this chapter we discuss how each process and sub-process relate to one another, and how their contribution to achieving the overall transformational objective can be assessed based on the notions of sufficiency and necessity. These considerations are essential to ensure that we direct our attention to processes that are absolutely essential being successful.

Download file   (51MB MP4 file)

Issues, Options, and Arguments

In this final session Dr Yearworth explains how the STEEP problem structuring approach can be used to explore issues arising from poor performance of processes in the system and the development of options that could be implemented to resolve those issues. Arguments for and against the options can also be captured in the problem structuring method.

Download file   (24MB MP4 file)

Bristol Project Team - STEEP dissemination event - Sept 2015

The Bristol Project Team hosts an event for citizens and interested party as they presented and discussed their findings and outputs from the project

Download file   (0B file)

Reports & Papers

Introduction

Filmed during a training session conducted at The Engine Shed in Bristol’s Temple Quarter Enterprise Zone, Dr Yearworth welcomes project partners from San Sebastian and Florence and outlines the main six learning outcomes for the session. Dr Yearworth also provides some background to the concepts underpinning systems thinking, describing it as both an academic discipline and a problem structuring approach to dealing with messy complex issues.

Download file   (556kB PDF file)

Systemic Problem Structuring

In this section Dr Yearworth provides further systems principles associated with problem structuring methods, specifically focussing on characterising the difference between the hard systems and soft systems traditions and how the STEEP project will be making use of soft, conceptual, systems models. Of fundamental importance in this section is getting across an appreciation of working with multiple conflicting stakeholder worldviews through the use of group model building workshops.

Download file   (2MB PDF file)

System Purpose

Here we describe how to structure a top-level transformational statement, which will be the focus of the system we require to achieve change. Drawing on the creation of root definitions in Soft Systems Methodology we show how to describe the overall transformation that the modelling is trying to achieve and the relevant owners, actors and customers of this transformation.

Download file   (621kB PDF file)

Systems Modelling

This session describes the specific systems modelling approach that forms the basis of the Problem Structuring Method being used by the STEEP project. Dr Yearworth describes the use of Hierarchical Process Modelling as a means to discuss how a transformational process, such as achieving the low operation carbon development in the Bristol Temple Quarter Enterprise Zone, can be achieved.

Download file   (2MB PDF file)

System Performance

This chapter explains how stakeholders in a group model building workshop can begin to evaluate the performance of processes in the system. We use a specific three-valued logic which uses colours to represent good performance (green), unknown performance or uncertainty (white), and poor performance (red). For obvious reasons we refer to this notation as ‘Italian Flag’. We use assessments of poor performance and uncertainty as a guide to directing the actions we need to take to achieve the transformational objective.

Download file   (1MB PDF file)

Necessary and Sufficient Processes

In this chapter we discuss how each process and sub-process relate to one another, and how their contribution to achieving the overall transformational objective can be assessed based on the notions of sufficiency and necessity. These considerations are essential to ensure that we direct our attention to processes that are absolutely essential being successful.

Download file   (4MB PDF file)

Issues, Options, and Arguments

In this final session Dr Yearworth explains how the STEEP problem structuring approach can be used to explore issues arising from poor performance of processes in the system and the development of options that could be implemented to resolve those issues. Arguments for and against the options can also be captured in the problem structuring method.

Download file   (3MB PDF file)

STEEP leaflet

Download file   (517kB PDF file)

San Sebastian's Smart City Plan 2016-2020

This document synthesizes the Donostia / San Sebastián Smart Plan and an Action Plan for the period 2016-2020 and meets two main goals: On the one hand, establishing a strategic line with shared goals and, on the other hand, giving coherence and coordination to the public action, capitalizing on all actions carried out from different Municipal Departments and Public Corporations of the City Council.

Download file   (23MB PDF file)

Executive Summary of Florence's Smart City Plan (version July 2015)

Florence has chosen to develop a strategic plan whose targets summarise all the efforts and the policies the administration has already adopted (SEAP – 2020) or is going to adopt in the very next future (COP21 – 2030). This document gives an overview those efforts and policies.

Download file   (6MB PDF file)

Executive Summary of Bristol’s Smart City Energy Plan (version July 2015)

Bristol’s approach was to draw on the STEEP methodology to produce a plan which focuses on tackling the threat of global climate change through the sustainable generation and use of energy. The Bristol Climate and Energy Security Framework includes a strategy and action plan which sets out existing commitments, progress to date against these and what more must be done to meet them. Future actions to be led or enabled by Bristol City Council are defined as well as a broader range of initiatives which are in progress across the city.

Download file   (1MB PDF file)

STEEP Newsletters

STEEP Newsletter #1 - March 2014

Download file   (2MB PDF file)

STEEP Newsletter #2 - October 2014

Download file   (2MB PDF file)

STEEP Newsletter #3 - April 2015

Download file   (2MB PDF file)

STEEP Newsletter #4 - September 2015

Download file   (1MB PDF file)